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of trade, as well. yes, an ipad in china gets made and it's value point $50. but it's only about $20 of that that goes to china and the rest goes back to the u.s. we'll get into the dynamics of trade, as well, and how we measure it. we'll also be joined by the ilo director general, as well, guy rider. we'll hear from the head of the world intellectual property organization. so it's a big trade day here from geneva on "worldwide exchange." lots of great things to get into. and by the way, 157 members of the wto, shortly to be 158. kazakhstan today should get the approval, all 157 ambassadors are here. they will get approval later this afternoon. so an ever expanding membership base. >> kazakhstan being just the latest. plenty more from ross straight ahead on the program. in the meantime, we want to check in our how markets are doing. so much attention on italy. in particular, you can see the message broadly speaking this morning is in negative, we're seeing about a four to one outpacing decliners versus vapsers here. the stoxx 600 is down abo about .37%. let's take a look across the t
.s. has slapped duties on wind turbine towers on china on price its says were unfairly cheap. this comes as washington welcomes a high-level chinese delegation led by the vice premier. his team is in the u.s. to talk trade and economy. he's expected to meet with u.s. treasury secretary tim geithner tomorrow. wang is the first official from the new leadership team to visit with the u.s. for more on the impact and implications of this, let's speak with frank ching, adjunct associate professor at the chinese university of hong kong. frank, hi. the first news that we're getting out of this appears to be more import duties s. this going to be the theme of u.s./china relations, or do you expect these meetings to be more of a thaw? >> well, i think that these are the first meetings since the new leadership in china was installed. and since president obama saw -- well, won second term. i think both sides want to make use of this occasion to improve their relationship. so this joint annual meeting is a platform, and i think that they will probably be able to achieve some progress on issues of con
.s. in general is looking positive. and the u.s. is creating a lot more jobs. china is still positive in the fourth quarter. china is going to show a slow and steady improvement. so we need those. >> higher expectations stronger in the likes of taiwan, india and brazil. let's go back to where you say they're weakest. greece, italy, spain, the netherlands. this is a very weak feature, indeed. how bad in it? >> it's bad. the eurozone is the global economic problem now. if you look at asia where i just returned from, both countries are feeling optimistic. but they seem to be inwardly focused now by being a triangle of china, india, indonesia. we're not seeing a great benefit into europe as we did before. for instance, germany is looking pretty pessimistic. based on its lack of export performance to places like china. >> yeah. when the bundes bank came out and shortly downgraded forecasts, how is the employment picture? if you've got a relatively healthy china and the u.s. consumer bounce back, wouldn't that help germany? >> it certainly would. germany is relatively flat in terms of the e
said. his point was that the transformation of the world economy lifts four people in china and india out of poverty and into the middle class, and meanwhile one american drops out of the middle class, that's not such a bad trade, right? like four to one. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company, and this was like a really, a person who was really sort of charming and lovely life story. he was taiwanese-born, his parents were immigrants, and his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily poor. i love that, you know, imagine that. we're going to be temporarily poor. and sure enough, he and his brother just like complete rock stars, both of them went to stuyvesant in new york. they were such avid members of the math club that now they fund it. one brother is -- yeah, exactly. one is in silicon valley, the other is derivatives on wall street. this brother, the cfo, his parents were really angry at him because he dropped out of a ph.d. program at stanford having gone to harvard to start becoming a plutocrat. so very hard working guy, very smart,
, calling it a violation of u.n. security council resolutions. and china, north korea's long-time ally, also expressed regret launch calling on the state to abide by u.n. resolutions. now u.n. security council diplomats have also set up an emergency meeting today at the request of the u.s. and japan. back to you. >> all right. thanks for that. >>> the senior fellow at the school of international studies at the technological university. thanks for joining us. what does this test do today? what's the impact on regional securit security? >> short term, i don't think the impact is going to be particularly severe. in some ways it's been priced in. and for once, north korea's rocket actually did what it was supposed to do which is fly south and not pass over any territory. so in that sense, the reaction can be contained. on the other hand, it caught people by surprise. and i think there will be questions ask the about how could the intelligence -- how good the intelligence was in the u.s. and south korea in failing to pick this up. >> how significant is it that this launch appears to be successful
and where is china all of this? >> so there are several different pieces. one of them going back to the economy, we used to have much higher practices than we do now. how were we able to have full employment on that? we did not have the system of the budget deficits what makes it so much harder and just to sort of duty had enough, it is the persistence of trade deficit least not have one and now we do and that is a big drag on the economy. which hasn't been better actually the trade deficit is actually significantly down but not all. we have had some that have become more competitive that is the front on which we need to work. the political debate hasn't kept up with the reality it's no longer the quarter of that anymore. it's the broadest of countries some that need to be worked on and the next president isn't just china bashing but what do we need to do have a world that is everybody trying to run a trade surplus which the government believes it is possible. [laughter] >> then there is this issue of trade and income inequality. and there's a similar level that presumably had re
with this, the british, the french, the germans, russia, china, they all tend to view this as a proliferation problem. the conversation between iran and the other side tends to be about that issue, very narrowly focused. to kind of move that conversation, you have to figure out a different kind of architecture. the five plus one process, as such, is designed to deal with the corporation issue and the composition is that has to do with the iranian violation of the mpt and there have been 62 -- six security council resolutions that suggests sanctions. there are two countries who suggest that the issue between -- that this is not a proliferation issue but has to do with the character of the regime and one of them is israel who does not view this as strictly an arms dispute and the second one is iran who similarly suggests that although it is an arms control issue, they are really using arms control as a way to undermine the regime. there are two actors in this particular conflagration who are not accepting the argument being that this is about nuclear infractions as oppo
union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are religious, it does not make you write all the time. >> get in line with everybody else. with respect, i disagree with what you just said. the religious right, which i obviously am not a member, rose after the religious left in the form of the reverend martin luther king and jesse jackson, etc., etc. the re
of tragedies. >> there was also a similar incidence in china of someone going in but they didn't have a gun so nobody died. it happened on the exact same day. >> stephanie: if we all go to our regular talking points, we're never going to get anything done. all of those catchphrases, guns don't kill people, all of that stuff, there is something we can do. and i honestly feel like everything's a part of it. mental health, cutbacks that affect mental health. obviously guns. senator feinstein's bill should be the start of what we do. absolutely we should ban assault weapons and the clips and close the loophole at gun shows. >> a woman was calling said her granddaughter's school has bulletproof glass and metal doors. you can't get in. >> stephanie: louis gohmert on cue, we need teachers armed. we need more guns. >> we need 6-year-olds armed. >> stephanie: seriously first grade principals, we need them armed like rambo? >> you know what? i would rather have them be trained to teach children. i don't need them to be trai
that before in china, another mentally disturbed man went into a school and knifed 23 people, 22 of them children. i think one has died. the difference was, he had a knife. adam lanza had a gun. >> the united states, for better or for worse, is a gun culture. we are a culture that uniquely in the world sees the value and significance and firearms. it is been the case since the founding of the republic. the second amendment is scorned by many people, but it has been there since the beginning and it is very meaningful to millions and millions of people in this country. farmers represent not something evil to many americans -- firearms represent not something evil to many americans, the self-reliance. the american profile. as a result, we end up with a country that is suffused with firearms. >> and "meet the press," the author of the 1994 salt weapons and i and feinstein said she is introducing a bill to reform gun ownership standards in the next congress. >> i'm going to introduce in the senate and the same bill be introduced in the house, a bill to ban assault weapons. it will ban the sal
without a visa. china's going to allow foreign visitor to stay in way ginning for -- beijing for three days if they're heading into another country. but you have to buy a lot of stuff. [laughter] console, energy and qt production company have submitted multimillion dollar bids to drill for natural gas and oil on land surrounding pittsburgh international airport. the drilling revenue would reduce gate fees which could lead to cheaper flights. pan tone which -- named emerald as 2013's color of the year. the time has come, and that's today's speed read. liz: emerald green. the parent company of the toronto stock exchange is joining forces with the maple group in a move that is enabling the company to expand it product offerings. david: tom kloet is the see crow of -- ceo of tmx group. what a pleasure to see you. you're an american, by the way. >> i am. david: they brought in an outsider. there are a lot of similarities between canada and the u.s. but some very distinct differences, and one of them involves the markets. you are the main equity and clearing facility. you have everything in
the russian point of view was that gorbachev also wanted to improve relations with china and japan. and with 100 inf missiles directed at him, how was he going to do that? it's really not in their interest to have 100 missiles out of europe. and it was really in their interest. now, we now have access, have for some years, records of the polit bureau discussions. and let me go back to a couple words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev, he wrote out on a yellow pad several pages, without any prompting from anybody, what he wanted to achieve in geneva in his first meeting. this was handed literally to me as we are getting off the plane in geneva, saying this is what the president has on his mind. if he is wrong somewhere, we will have to straighten him out. actually, it was a very, very precise paper. and among other things, he pointed out that our biggest problems, one of these was a lack of trust. that he had to find a way to begin to create trust. we're not going to solve anything else. he also had it, if i don't achieve anything else, i must convince gorbachev t
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)